Sprint 6 Retrospective

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Needing a reading list

So for this week, I have decided to read “Reading List”  pattern from the Apprentice Patterns by Adevele Oshineye and Dave Hoover. I chose this one because I believe there is something that should be done on a daily basis. Since that reading is exactly that, it should be wise to read this pattern at least once.

This pattern starts off with the context of having so much information that is needed to learn after developing the language. The problem is that the number of books to read is increasing than that of actual reading them ourselves. There is also the issue of figuring out where to start from the number of books. To solve this issue, one must maintain a reading list that not only helps in remembering the books read but also track the books that are planned to be read. Creating a text file is an option to write the list down as it is under source control and simplest implication of the pattern. For what it is worth, there is a need for a clear understanding of which books to prioritize in reading and in order by the subject.

From this pattern, what I found useful is identifying the books that would be worth reading based on a list given by any book. This will help in finding hidden connections related to the topic or language to an extent.  Mentors may recommend must-read books that even peers can discuss with one other and advise with the aspects. With data gathering over the years, patterns, gaps, and trends is starting to be seen. This pattern has changed my mind in giving suggestions to other people in what to read. I don’t disagree with anything since it does give clarification in what to do with the knowledge gained thus far and all the books needed to be read in due time.

Based on the content of this pattern, I would say this is a great and simple read as a way in reflecting on a reading habit. This pattern has helped me understand in which to read first for what topic I could have next. For future practice, I will try to write a reading list in different ways beside a text file in case anything happens to that specific device.

Link to the blog: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/ch06.html#reading_list

Sweep the Floor

For this week, I have decided to read “Sweep the floor” pattern from the Apprentice Patterns by Adevele Oshineye and Dave Hoover. The reason I chose this one is because I want to understand from a perspective of joining a team for the first time. I believe this will help me in knowing what to do for future work.

This pattern starts off with the context of being a new apprentice in a project. The problem is that unsure of being in the same place as the team is right and the team is also unsure in that question. Finding a way to contribute to the team can be difficult since there is also the thought of gaining the team’s trust and standards for the project. To solve this issue, volunteering for simple, yet necessary, tasks is the thing to do. By doing a high-quality job for a task even if it does not matter in the long run, it helps in showing the team we are eager to contribute and become successful.  For the worth of doing these tasks, it will fill in the gaps of knowledge that are needed throughout the journey.

From this pattern, what I found useful is identifying the books that would be worth reading based on a list given by any book. Even if it is the smallest task, it will help in the overall process of the project and gain the trust of the team little by little. Examples would be responding to maintenance requests, bug fixing, updating documentations, and so on. This pattern has changed my mind in regarding what people expect from looking at jobs. Even if the education gained gives the chance to being hired, it is always going back to square one and that is not a bad thing. It means that we can send a messenge with this opportunity to show what we want to express to a team with doing tasks, even taking the ones that feel awkward to do. I don’t disagree with anything in this pattern because it went over pros and cons that are relatable in the workplaces.

Based on the content of this pattern, I would say this is a good read based on how it approaches being new to a team for a job. This pattern has helped me in knowing that sometimes it is alright to take a step back and do small tasks related that can improve my skills during projects and still contribute. For future practice, I will try to do tasks that are related to projects that has been either not fully done or ones that are simple but effective.

Link to the blog: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/ch04s05.html

Studying the Classics

For this week, I have decided to read “Study the Classics” from the Apprentice Patterns by Adevele Oshineye and Dave Hoover. I have chosen this one because there must be reasons why do we go back to old books even though we have a great education from being self-taught. I believe this will help me in seeing the appeal of finding old books and read them, even the ones I kept for years.

The pattern starts off with the context of being self-taught or had a highly practical education that valued skills training over skills. When it comes to the problem, it is the people who are experienced makes references to concepts from books that they expect the self-respecting software developer to know it. To solve this problem, the thing is to ask about the unknown concepts and which book they came from. One important thing to note is that studying the classics may lead to is too much investment and that can mean abandoning the knowledge that is meant to improve day to day craftsmanship skills. So keeping this in mind, it is wise to mix up modern books with the classics in the list so that the knowledge gained would be fully understood while improving skills or even gaining new ones.

What I found interesting about this pattern is that it advises to read the oldest book first and ask the developer why they still own this particular book today. Owning a book that is dated to a very long time could still be relevant and maybe to prove a point when referencing the concepts. From reading this pattern, I understand that it is not too bad to have a refresher with the old books if it means by proving myself or others on what am I trying to convey even it is simple. I don’t disagree with anything in this pattern as it helped me see the knowledge behind reading old books.

Based on the content of this pattern, I would say this is a simple but effective one to read.  This pattern showed a good perspective from being self-taught.  For future practice, I will try to find books that gives concepts I have not heard of and when the time is needed to expand knowledge even more, I will find books that people suggest to me.

 

Link to the article: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/ch06s03.html

 

Sharing what I learned

For this week, I have decided to read “Share what you learned” from the Apprentice Patterns by Adevele Oshineye and Dave Hoover. I have chosen this one because while I do understand that the lessons learned will be useful for my self-improvement, I wonder about how to express to people if they seek the knowledge that I have gained from those lessons. I believe this will help me in seeing the value of sharing the knowledge and maybe help with devising new strategies in the future of my career.

The pattern starts off with the context of us being an apprentice for a little while in a business or a team. Understanding that we know a few things, people look to us as a source of knowledge. The problem being is we have been only focusing exclusively on our own improvements as a craftsmen and maybe communication to others. To solve this problem, thinking back to the last few things learned regarding the specific topics should help in with expressing the knowledge gained. With this information, creating tutorials or making presentations at conferences are possible as it proves the knowledge that the peers would like to know. It carries the risk of sharing information that is not meant to seen but it can help with rethinking for the better.

What I found useful in this pattern is that it elaborates on the significance of sharing the lessons even though it is little. No matter how little the knowledge is on a specific topic, it is still better than most and it can with building tutorials that we wish we had when the first time going through it. From reading this pattern, I understand that fully learning on my own and sharing the knowledge is showing that there is eagerness to be part of a community. I don’t disagree with anything in this pattern as it showed me in figuring out what to do with limited knowledge.

Based on the content of this pattern, I would say this is a simple but effective one to read.  This pattern showed an idea in what to do when it is time to share with the knowledge gained.  For future practice, I will try to write down ideas that I learned on my own on a separate document or notebook so that if someone asked me regarding my knowledge on something, then I will guide them the best I can.

 

Link to the blog: https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/apprenticeship-patterns/9780596806842/ch05s07.html